Now you have a chance to ask Dr. Rowe a question directly. We look forward to answering your questions and being able to provide you and your loved ones with the best in long-term health care.

Dr. Carl E. Rowe, Pharm. D.

Dr. Carl E. Rowe, Pharm. D.

Integrated Care Communities was founded by Dr. Carl Rowe and his wife, Bette Rowe. Dr. Rowe, a leader and expert in the fields of residential and long-term care, is a licensed pharmacist and former professor at the University of Southern California Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy. A respected expert on health and social services issues, he has served as an advisor to many departments of the State of California. His wife, Bette Rowe, is his partner in Developmental Client Care Industries, a Moreno Valley company dedicated to providing residential care services to disabled adults. The couple bring their combined experience in health and caregiving to their new project: Integrated Care Communities.

“As Moreno Valley residents,” says Dr. Rowe, “Bette and I are especially pleased to be part of a project designed to enhance the quality of life for families right here in our own community.”

Our Web site contains a lot of information, but if your questions aren’t being answered, please contact us directly.

Thank you,
Dr. Carl Rowe

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Long Term Compatibility: Are You Ready?

As a population, we’re not just getting older, we’re getting much older. Breakthroughs in health care, new diagnostics and treatments are keeping us alive longer, but not always in better health. Another sad reality: retirement is financially disappointing for many older Americans. A recent study conducted by Kemper Investments and the AARP shows that 60% of Americans between the age of 50 and 54 do not have, or do not expect to have enough money to live at their desired standard in retirement. Nearly four in 10 face, or expect to face the reality of having to work during their retirement years. And worse, 16% of Americans in their 50s are already providing for an elderly parent.

These are tough realities. But because we’re talking about our loved ones, we’ve got to face them. If you’re dealing or preparing to deal with the care of your parents, talking honestly about their finances can be the single most important thing to getting ahead of problems before they start.

Keep the line of communication open regarding health issues. Ask sensitive questions, and listen carefully. They may be embarrassed to tell you about a problem, like blurry vision. If all they need are new glasses, then great, but you don’t want them driving until you know for sure. Be ready to offer respectful solutions. Prevention is always cheaper.

Help the older folks stay stimulated and involved. Studies show that a curious and engaged mind may keep serious dementia at bay for years, and certainly makes life more fun. Keeping active is healthier for everyone.
For younger parents, encourage them to develop parallel interests like teaching, consulting or a craft business that might provide part-time income in retirement. Not only is it fun, the extra income can help bridge the gap between Social Security and Retirements funds.

If your parents are young enough, consider Long Term Care insurance (LTC). If you are over 50, you may want to consider it for yourself. It covers health costs associated with the care of older people – care which can get very expensive. Medicare only pays a portion. And like it or not, most of us will require some type of skilled nursing care, either at home or in a facility. Currently, the average length of stay is 2.9 years. As the population ages, the only alternative for families is to drain their wealth to cover the costs or attempt to care themselves. Not good.

LTC (Long Term Care) insurance is becoming more readily available all the time. Start by getting recommendations from your own insurance agent, or call HICAP (Health Insurance Counseling & Advocacy Program) an insurance counseling service. For the office in your area, call (800) 273-4227. They can direct you to an office located close to you.

So Take Care of Yourself…

Living to be 100 is not as rare as it once was. Although only one in 10,000 Americans will live a century, it’s projected that by the year 2050 800,000 people will be over 100.